• Oregon Fishing Report July 15th - Rogue River


    ROGUE RIVER

    Rogue River, lower: steelhead, Chinook, surfperch

    Anglers have started picking up fall chinook the bay trolling anchovies or an anchovy with spinner blade. With minus tides this week the best fishing will be late mornings or afternoons. Water temperatures are increasing and flows droppings so anglers can expect chinook to continue stacking up in the bay. This time of year the best fishing is from Highway 101 downstream to the mouth.

    Anglers are picking up a few early run summer steelhead casting spinners or fly fishing, but river temperatures are getting pretty warm and making it hard to get fish to bite. Best time to fish is first thing in the morning.

    Anglers are picking up surfperch on many beaches and at the mouth of the Rogue River. Anglers should check the marine forecast before heading out.

    Rogue River, middle: steelhead, trout, spring Chinook

    Anglers are catching summer steelhead in the middle Rogue. Chinook fishing remains slow in this section of the river. A decrease in the release from Lost Creek Reservoir will mean much lower river flows for the next several weeks. The flow at Grants Pass was 1560 cfs and the water temperature was 67°F on July 15.

    Rogue River, upper: steelhead, trout, spring Chinook

    Anglers are catching spring Chinook and summer steelhead in the river from Gold Hill upstream to Cole Rivers Hatchery. Drift fishing, backtrolling bait-wrapped plugs, and backbouncing with bait or drift bobbers are popular and productive techniques. Fishing has been most productive early and late in the day.

    Beginning July 1, anglers can keep non-adipose fin-clipped (wild) Chinook salmon in the Rogue River from Fishers Ferry Boat Ramp to Dodge Bridge per the Southwest Zone fishing regulations. Above Dodge Bridge, non-adipose fin-clipped salmon will still have to be released.

    Trout fishing has been good. Anglers may keep up to five adipose fin-clipped rainbow trout per day. All other trout must be released.

    The release from Lost Creek Reservoir was 1512 cfs and the water temperature was 53°F the morning of July 14. The flow at Gold Ray was 1530 cfs and water temperature was 62°F. As of July 9, 6624 spring Chinook and 321 summer steelhead had entered Cole Rivers Hatchery.

    Rogue River, above Lost Creek Reservoir: trout

    Major public access sites on the Rogue River between Prospect and Minnehaha Creek are being stocked with over 2,000 legal-sized rainbow trout each week. In addition to the stocked trout, naturally produced rainbow, cutthroat, brown, and brook trout are available in the river and in many tributaries. Plentiful trout, beautiful scenery, easy access, and an abundance of Forest Service campgrounds and day-use areas make this a great place to go trout fishing.

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  • Heils Guide Service Rockin' Their New Pavati Guardian


    This beautiful Upper Rogue River Spring Chinook Salmon was caught last week running plugs by Jason Heil of Heils Guide Service while rockin' his new 17 x 61 Pavati Guardian Model drift boat.

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  • Oregon Fishing Report July 8th - Rogue River


    Oregon Fishing Report for July 8th, 2014 - Rogue River

    ROGUE RIVER

    Rogue River, lower: steelhead, Chinook, surfperch
     
    Anglers have started picking up fall chinook the bay trolling anchovies or an anchovy with spinner blade. With minus tides this week the best fishing will be late mornings or afternoons. Water temperatures are increasing and flows droppings so anglers can expect chinook to continue stacking up in the bay. This time of year the best fishing is from Highway 101 downstream to the mouth.

    Anglers are picking up a few early run summer steelhead casting spinners or fly fishing, but river temperatures are getting pretty warm and making it hard to get fish to bite. Best time to fish is first thing in the morning.

    Anglers are picking up surfperch on many beaches and at the mouth of the Rogue River. Anglers should check the marine forecast before heading out.

    Rogue River, middle: steelhead, trout, spring Chinook

    Anglers are catching a few summer steelhead in the middle Rogue. Chinook fishing remains slow in this section of the river. A decrease in the release from Lost Creek Reservoir will mean much lower river flows for the next several weeks. The flow at Grants Pass was 1600 cfs and the water temperature was averaging 67°F on July 7.

    Rogue River, upper: steelhead, trout, spring Chinook

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  • Newsletter - July 2014

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  • Catch of the Month - BEAST ALERT!!! 32+lb Springer!


    Catch of the Month - BEAST ALERT!!! 32+lb Springer!

    Pavati Marine's own Steve Crisler sure knows how to put people on the fish and just how to catch them. This monster 32+lb Springer, (which currently is in 1st Place in Sportsman's Warehouse Salmon Derby) was caught by Tasha Crisler on the Rogue River in White City, Oregon during a 4th of July outing with one of Pavati's Destroyer powerboats that has been nicknamed "The Dragon Slayer".




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  • Spring Chinook Salmon with Sweet Potato Ravioli


    Astoria Spring Chinook Salmon, Sweet Potato Ravioli, Zucchini, Cherry Tomato, Rosemary, Sage, and Beurre Fondue from Nicholas Yanes of H50 Bistro & Bar at Hotel Fifty - Portland, OR

    INGREDIENTS:

    Sweet Potato Ravioli
    400 grams roasted sweet potato
    2 egg yolks
    50 grams crème fraîche
    10 grams fines herbes, finely chopped
    500 grams semolina flour
    400 grams all-purpose flour
    400 grams eggs
    300 grams egg yolks
    egg wash
    Ravioli filling
    Zucchini, Cherry Tomato, Rosemary, Sage, and Beurre Fondue
    200 grams whole butter, cold
    2 cloves garlic, cut fine brunoise
    1 small shallot, cut fine brunoise
    150 milliliters white wine
    10 baby zucchinis, cut in half ( leave blossoms on if possible)
    2 sage leaves, cut fine chiffonade
    1 small branch rosemary, finely chopped
    10 cherry tomatoes, quartered
    Astoria Spring Chinook Salmon
    4 200-gram portions spring salmon, pin bones removed and skin on
    Fine sea salt
    30 milliliters grapeseed oil
    To Assemble and Serve
    Salted water
    parsley

    METHOD:

    For the Sweet Potato Ravioli Dough:
    In a Kitchen Aid mixer with the paddle attachment mix together the sweet potato, 2 egg yolks, crème fraîche, and fines herbes on medium speed until well incorporated. Reserve. Mix the semolina and all-purpose flours together until well incorporated, then transfer to the mixer with the dough hook attachment. Slowly incorporate the eggs and the egg yolks until a ball forms around the hook. Continue to knead the mixer for 5 minutes or until the dough begins to lighten in color. Using the pasta attachment, roll out the dough to the number 6 setting and reserve sheets. Cut pieces of pasta into 3 inch squares, brush two perpendicular sides of the square with egg wash, put 1 tablespoon of the sweet potato filling in center, and fold over to make an isosceles triangle, ensuring that there are no air pockets in the ravioli.

    For the Zucchini, Cherry Tomato, Rosemary, Sage, and Beurre Fondue:
    Take a small knob of the butter and sweat the garlic and shallots, do not caramelize. Add wine and reduce to au sec. Add zucchini, sage and rosemary, then mount with butter. When butter is fully emulsified, add the tomatoes to keep texture and freshness.

    For the Astoria Spring Chinook Salmon:
    Dry the salmon very toughly, and season all surfaces with fine sea salt. Over medium heat, warm the grapeseed oil in a skillet. Once hot, put salmon, 1 portion at a time, skin side down, in the pan, allowing 15 to 20 seconds for pan to recover before adding the next piece of fish. To ensure crispy skin, do not disturb pan and make sure the heat stays constant for 7 minutes. Once skin is crispy, flip and sear the other sides of the salmon for 1 minute. Put on a cooling rack to rest.

    To Assemble and Serve:
    Boil the raviolis in salted water for 2 minutes. To plate, divide the ravioli and coat with the Beurre Fondue. Top with a fillet of Astoria Spring Chinook Salmon and garnish with parsley.


    Compliments of:

    Nicholas Yanes of H50 Bistro & Bar at Hotel Fifty - Portland, OR

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  • Chinook Salmon with Smoked Salmon Leek and Potato Chowder


    Chinook Salmon with Smoked Salmon Leek & Potato Chowder

    • prep time 60 min
    • total time 90 min
    • serves 4

    Ingredients

    Chanterelle & Sweet Corn

    2 Tbsp (30 mL) unsalted butter

    2 Tbsp (30 mL) extra virgin olive oil

    1 lb. (454 g) chanterelle mushrooms, cleaned and quartered

    1 shallot, minced

    1 cup (250 mL) sweet corn kernels

    2 Tbsp (30 mL) finely chopped flat leaf Italian parsley

    salt and pepper

    Smoked Salmon Chowder

    ¼ cup (60 mL) unsalted butter

    2 large leeks, white part only, halved lengthwise and cut into 1/4-inch slices

    2 sprig thyme

    ¼ cup (60 mL) white wine

    1 cup (250 mL) good quality fish stock

    1 cup (250 mL) heavy (35% MF) cream

    1 lb. (454 g) skin-on parboiled fingerling potatoes, cut crosswise into 1/4-inch coins

    1 cup (250 mL) smoked salmon chunks

    2 Tbsp (30 mL) chopped dill

    1 Tbsp (15 mL) minced preserved lemon rind, optional

    salt and pepper

    Chinook Salmon

    ¼ cup (60 mL) unsalted butter

    4 skin-on Chinook centre-cut salmon fillets (each about 8 oz/227 g) seasoned on all sides with kosher salt and freshly cracked black pepper


    Directions

    Chanterelle & Sweet Corn

    1. In a large skillet set over medium-high heat, add butter and oil.

    2. Add mushrooms and sauté until most of the liquid has evaporated, about 10 minutes, stirring frequently, then stir in shallots and corn and cook until heated through, about 5 minutes more, stirring frequently, then add parsley and season to taste with salt and pepper.

    Smoked Salmon Chowder

    1. In a Dutch oven set over medium heat, melt butter, add leeks, and cook until softened, about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, then stir in thyme, wine and stock and cook 5 minutes more.

    2. Stir in cream and bring mixture to a boil, then gently fold in potatoes, smoked salmon, dill and preserved lemon, if using, and season to taste with salt and pepper.

    Chinook Salmon

    1. Set a large heavy bottomed skillet over medium-high heat and add butter.

    2. Working in batches if necessary, place filets skin-side-down and cook until skin is crispy, about 4 minutes. Turn filets over and cook 4 minutes more, basting occasionally with butter. Turn filets on side and cook for another 4 minutes per side; total cooking time is 12 minutes for medium doneness.

    3. To Plate: Spoon chowder into each of 4 bowls, place filet on top and spoon over chanterelle-corn and serve immediately.


    Courtesy of: 
    Lynn Crawford of Pitchin' In

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  • Pavati's Fly Tying Tips - Lynch's Double Dot Egg

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  • Pavati's Fly Tying Tips - Upper Rogue River July 2014


    Trout fishing is open! Fish stone flies on top, or under an indicator. Summer Steelhead have arrived at the hatchery! Spring Chinook fishing should improve through the month as more fish arrive to the hatchery. Fishing pressure is increasing on the river as people look to catch Salmon. Remember fishing etiquette when around other anglers.

    "Must-have fly fishing patterns in descending order of importance:

    •                                                                                                                                                                                           Kaufmanns Stonefly Nymph
    • Lynch's Double Dot Egg
    • Tunghead Stonefly
    • Premium Alaska Selection
    • Med A Egg Sucking Leech
    • Bead Head Emerging Sparkle Caddis Pupa
    • Steelie Omelet

    Water flow: 1,800 at Cole Rivers Hatchery (as of June 26, 2014).

    Visibility: 30 inches

    Water temperature at mid-day: 51 Degrees F

    Water condition: Clear

    Best time of day to fish: All day

    Best stretch: Below Lost Creek Dam to Gold Hill.

    Best access point: Cole Rivers Hatchery, Casey State Park, Rouge Elk Campground, Shady Cove Bridge, Dodge Bridge, Touvelle State Park, Gold Ray Road.

    Fly fishing hatches in order of importance:

    Stonefly, Mayfly, Caddies, Midges

    Fish species: Trout, Steelhead, Salmon

    Fishing season: Year-round: Consult regulations for more information.

    Nearest airport: Rogue Valley International-Medford Airport (MFR)

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  • Pavati's Fly Tying Tips - Kaufmanns Stonefly Nymph

    kaufmann's stone fly

    HOOK: 5263, sizes 2-6; weighted

    THREAD: Black

    ANTENNAE: Black turkey biot

    TAIL: Same as antennae

    RIB: Black Schwannundaze

    ABDOMEN: Make a blend of angora goat in various colors to look iridescent; use black purple, claret, red, amber, brown, blue, and orange. Mix 2:1 with black Haretron

    WINGCASES: Three sections of turkey quill. Coat with Flexament and clip to shape before tying

    LEGS: Round black rubber

    THORAX: Same as abdomen

    HEAD: Same as abdomen      

    Uses

    Imitates the nymphs of the salmonfly (Pteronarcys californica). This fly must be fished on the bottom. Period. So weight it heavily under the body, then flatten the weight with pliers. For extra weight, put on a beadhead. Yes, you're going to lose a lot of flies.

    Variations

    The rubber legs are optional. Vary colors to match the available insects. Most of the big salmonfly nymphs are black, with some chocolate brown ones. The slightly smaller golden stoneflies are more of a mottled tan; use size 8-12 hooks for them.

    How to Fish

    Dead drift on the bottom with an indicator or tight line presentation. The best areas are bouldery sections, riffles, and just below riffles. If you find a moderatre drop-off just below a riffle, consider yourself blessed.      

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  • Drift Boat 101 – Getting Started with Gear


    As you may have heard there was an unfortunate death on the Lower Yuba not long ago when an older gentleman was knocked out of a drift boat rowed by his son and did not recover. I decided to post some articles about the art and safety regarding rowing a drift boat, raft or pontoon boat down a river. So with that premise, here’s the beginning of Drift Boat 101 - Getting Started with Gear;

    With more and more people floating our rivers in drift boats, rafts and pontoon boats it is important to emphasize the education and practice to row boats safely.

    Safety and Gear

    When getting together the gear to outfit a drift boat there is more to it than rods, reels and flies. Lets go over a list of safety gear.


    Life Vests

    There should be life vests ready and available for all people in the boat.

    I’ll put the life vests on the seats so they are accessible. When scouting a run and a difficult or technical run is anticipated. Put them on! They will be of not much use if they’re stowed away or not on.



    Throw Bag

    You should have a throw bag which are available at NRS which can be used if you ever 
    have someone overboard and then can throw a line to haul them to safety. Essential on big water Class III and above. Not really necessary on class II or lower. 




    First Aid Kit

    As with any outdoor activity having a well stocked first aid kit is a very good idea.

    Here’s a link to a HRS first aid kit in a waterproof bag.

    http://www.nrsweb.com/shop/product.asp?pfid=27431&pdeptid=1076



    Sunscreen

    I try to always have sunscreen available for myself for whoever else might need it.

    Simms make a good one, but just about any good brand will work.




    Rowers Gloves

    A good pair of rowers gloves comes in handy if you’re not on the river 
    rowing everyday and can prevent blisters and sores on your hands.



    Sunglasses

    Everyone in the boat should have sunglasses.

    This is a safety issue as much as a tool to help spot fish. A hook in the eye is no one’s idea of a fun day.

    I like the Action Optics Guides Choice.
    http://www.smithoptics.com




    Break Down Oar

    Carlisle Oars sells a breakdown oar that can be strapped under a rowers seat in a drift boat or along the tube on a full sized raft or cat. You don’t want to be halfway down a river and lose an oar. Get One! 


    The next article, Driftboat 101 – Basic Rowing Technique, will get started with the basic rowing technique and then on to making “Ferrying Maneuvers”.

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  • Team Pavati Pro Staff Spotlight - Jarrod Kelso with Hooked for Life Guide Service


    Team Pavati Pro Staff Jarrod Kelso with Hooked for Life Guide Service

    Check out these awesome springers that Pavati Pro Staff Jarrod Kelso with Hooked for Life Guide Service has been putting his clients on the last few weeks. Jarrod runs an awesome program and has been consistently putting keepers in the box. If you want to get on his new 16x61 Pavati Guardian drift boat and get after some kings, give him a call at 541-359-8370.
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  • Product Spotlight - Steve's Plug Bucket


    Thought I would share a very cool way to store your plugs this year...
    All you need is a couple buckets, a drill, some mag lips, lemon joy, scissors, and a brush. I found the yellow bucket at a paint store -one side is flat and the top rim comes down about an inch (that's key so the hook points don't hang below and get caught on everything). it's also kinda tampered so it fits real good in the blue bucket. All you need to do is drill holes every 1 1/2" around the top rim with a small enough bit so the the hooks just fit inside. This helps because if you have barbed hooks you will have to clear the barb to get the plug out and the plugs will not come out on their own while your driving etc. Next I cut a hole just big enough for a pair of scissors, but you could also use a small fillet knife or whatever. Works great, give it a try!

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  • Best Fishing Gear 2014

    Our experts evaluated and rigorously tested a boatload of all-new, innovative tackle—rods and reels, lures and lines, electronics and more—on lakes and streams across the country. This is the equipment that withstood every trial and earned their final approval.

    Flyfishing

    Reviewing this year’s Best Gear involved some tight calls. The number of product introductions was modest, but the overall quality was unusually high, even in lower-priced gear, and particularly in core tackle—rods, reels, and lines. Here are the very best.

    Nautilus CCF-X2 6/8 Reel

    Simply put, this 6- to 8-weight reel is all business—intelligent engineering executed in top-flight materials for light saltwater or heavy freshwater work. The heart of the matter is a fully enclosed cork-and-carbon-fiber disc brake protected by proprietary seals that exclude water, sand, and salt. With a large disc surface and hybrid-­ceramic bushings, the reel has an impressively low startup inertia (the company claims less than 1 percent) at all settings. The oversize drag knob, a blessing for wet or cold hands, takes the brake from free spool to lockdown through a six-turn adjustment window that allows exceptional fine-tuning of the resistance. Self-lubricating, long-lasting thermoplastic spindle bushings shave weight and are inert to corrosion. The large-arbor reel picks up an impressive 12 inches of line with each revolution. Extensive porting and a single-sided frame bring this reel in at a comfortable 7.6 ounces, making it a nice match with today’s superlight rods. But the frame is plenty sturdy for fighting the big boys and shows no flexing or racking, even at high drag settings.

    MSRP: $435; nautilusreels.com

    Scott Radian 8'6" 4-Weight Fly Rod

    A good all-purpose trout rod balances often contradictory characteristics—short-line presentation and distance delivery, finesse and power, tippet protection and backbone, and the ability to deliver small and large flies. It’s a tall order, but the Scott Radian 8-foot 6-inch 4-weight pulls it off. The fast-action rod feels light in the hand, more like a 3-weight, but there’s lots packed into it. It can summon the juice for longer-range casts, lobbing indicator rigs, and slapping the banks with big wind-resistant hoppers. But it also excels at short range, exhibiting none of the stiff clubbiness or other performance drawbacks that often characterize fast sticks. It has a great touch that puts the fly down right where you aim, and it stays true at progressively longer distances. The sensitive tip recovers quickly with no residual vibration to steal distance or compromise accuracy. Scott has taken pride of late in its rod aesthetics, and that shows here. It’s a handsome package and fishes beautifully.

    MSRP: $795; scottflyrod.com

    RIO Perception Fly Line

    Improvements in floating fly-line materials have largely addressed line coatings—the big culprit in durability and flotation problems. But innovation in the Perception series goes beneath the surface to a new ultra-low-stretch core that prevents line elongation under tension.  This absence of stretch greatly aids line pickup and allows for more precise mending. The line is built on a very castable, all-purpose taper that can throw a wide variety of fly types and sizes.

    MSRP: $90; rioproducts.com

    Orvis Gale Force Boat Bag

    The movable interior partitions of this semirigid bag aren’t the typical wimpy foam dividers that can let gear migrate but, rather, are rigid plastic panels that secure in a track around the inside perimeter. They stay in place and keep contents separate. Clear zippered pockets inside the lid keep phone and camera at the ready. It resists water entry when unzipped and kept all my fly gear dry on float trips.

    MSRP: $249; orvis.com

    BAITCASTING

    There’s no rule that says quality has to cost an arm and a leg, and our rod and reel winners prove it. Both take advantage of modern technology and materials, and both are in the price range of the weekend angler. By Joe Cermele

    Quantum Tour MG

    Weighing a mere 5.4 ounces, Quantum’s Tour MG fell in the middle of the road pricewise compared with others tested—but good luck finding another genuine magnesium baitcaster for under $300. To help keep things compact, Quantum completely enclosed the six-level brake-weight adjustment knob inside the side plate, which pops open easily with the push of a button. Fine-tune its capabilities with a few clicks of the outer-spool tension knob, and you can dial in to any lure weight, style, or presentation with pinpoint accuracy. This reel also delivers small lures without a hint of backlash.

    MSRP: $280; quantumfishing.com

    Cabela’s Tournament ZX

    As bass techniques constantly evolve, many rod manufacturers are not just producing a set of sticks in different lengths and actions, but whole series of specialty rods tailored to every specific bass lure and method, from drop-shotting to frog pitching to jerkbait twitching. Once, only high-end builders made these custom sticks, and they’d cost you plenty. Now Cabela’s has a series that offers the diehard bass fisherman a rod of high quality to match his or her favorite bait or presentation style—but that won’t drain the savings account.

    I tested all of the casting models of Cabela’s Tournament ZX series, but the 6-foot 9-inch Jerkbait/Topwater rod was my favorite. Before I even made a cast, the comfortable Winn Grip handles—a material most often found on golf clubs—impressed me. On the water, in the rain, no less, the grips proved their worth, providing excellent control with wet hands. The weight and sensitivity of the blank felt comparable to rods that cost quadruple the price, allowing me to keep perfect contact with baits during the entire retrieve.

    MSRP: $100; cabelas.com

    SPINNING

    Both of this year’s winners provide fishermen with more feel, more power, and more reliability in a smaller, lighter package. By Joe Cermele

    Shimano Stradic CI4+

    When you first pick up a Stradic CI4+ 2500FA, it might fool you into thinking it’s a stream-trout reel. In actuality, this compact 7-ounce spinner is intended to take on the biggest bass and walleyes you can find, and it shines in situations that require a finesse presentation and lighter line.

    To test the drags of the spinning reels this year, I didn’t chase walleyes or bass, but local carp that are usually willing to gobble a piece of corn. The Stradic’s drag took the first run of a 10-pounder without a hiccup, and the extra-sensitive knob made smooth work of adjustments on the fly. Most impressive were the overall tolerances; there was no torquing or binding like you often get when really putting heat on a smaller reel that’s battling a fish with shoulders.

    In terms of casting, I tested all the reels with 8-pound monofilament and paid particular attention to wind knots and line twist. On a breezy day, slinging everything from hair jigs to stickbaits, the Stradic outperformed the others, throwing no loops or twists. If light tackle is your game, this reel will deliver the goods.

    MSRP: $230; fish.shimano.com

    Lew’s Speed Stick 365 Carbon Nanolar

    There are four spinning rods in the 365 line, and our tester was the 7-foot ­medium-​­action model. From the start, this rod felt different. It had a noticeably weighty butt section that tapered away into a light, sensitive blank. In other words, backbone for setting, lifting, and fighting power, but a top end capable of keeping you in contact with lures during the subtlest presentations. During my testing, it performed almost like two rods in one, morphing with the task at hand. While bumping tubes and drop-shotting in a hole, I could feel every tick of the bottom. If I snagged up and lifted to pull free, it was as though all the power shifted to the butt section, and it felt like a much stouter rod than I was using only seconds earlier. For $100, it’s hard to beat the 365.

    MSP: $100; lews.com

    LURES & ACCESSORIES

    Selecting the criteria by which to judge this little-bit-of-this, little-bit-of-that category can get complicated. But the single trait shared by the two winners is ingenuity with purpose. One will get you more fish right away, and the other will keep everything that you need to get more fish ­organized, ­corrosion-free, and dry season after season. By Joe Cermele

    Rapala Scatter Rap Crank

    Lure companies have been experimenting with lip styles for decades, but when it came down to it, basically a lip was a lip was a lip. Then Rapala broke the mold—or rebuilt it, anyway—with this year’s Scatter Rap Crank, featuring the new Scatter Lip. With a scoop shape similar to a shovel, this simple yet innovative crankbait naturally skitters, switches direction, and changes its vibration on a straight retrieve. What that mimics is the behavior of a distressed baitfish almost to perfection. Over the summer, I worked one for river smallmouths, focusing on those holes where you know big fish live but are notoriously hard to catch. During three trips, I pulled bass from these spots within 10 casts. Considering that every local angler pounds these holes, it told me Rapala may just have developed something that really stands out. The Scatter Raps are made of balsa wood and are available in
    14 colors.

    MSRP: $9; rapala.com

    Flambeau ­Ultimate Tuff ’Tainer

    Give a run-of-the-mill plastic tackle tray enough time and eventually the corners will crack, the snaps will break, and the dividers will warp. These are all problems solved by Flambeau’s Ultimate Tuff ’Tainers, and they’ll only cost you a couple bucks more than those el cheapo trays. These boxes are gasketed and watertight. The seal is so strong it actually hisses like a fresh coffee can when you crack open the clamps, which are much stronger than traditional snaps. Reinforced corners are a big plus; they easily passed our drop test, even with heavy weights loaded into the trays. The dividers are Flambeau’s patented Zerust dividers, which have a polymer coating that inhibits rust and corrosion. Stick a small model in your pocket and wet wade worry-free. Fill the larger boxes and never sweat whether a few drops of water will rust out your stickbait arsenal. Ultimate Tuff ’Tainers come in four sizes and eight models.

    MSRP: $8.50–$16.25; flambeauoutdoors.com

    OUTERWEAR

    Along with last season’s regionally heavy rains came a deluge of new outerwear—particularly stuff to keep you dry, but also to keep you warm, or cool, or securely shod, or well organized. In the large pool of equipment nominated, here’s what rose to the top. By Ted Leeson

    Simms G3 Guide Stockingfoot Wader

    Old name, new wader. This redesign begins with a Gore-Tex five-layer fabric (exclusive to Simms) from the mid-thigh down, giving significantly improved breathability and excellent durability for brush busting or approaching spooky fish on your knees. For suppleness and upper-body mobility, the upper is a three-layer Gore-Tex Pro Shell. This chassis is tricked out with features designed by people who actually fish. A smart, flip-out chest panel has dual grommeted tippet sleeves, a reinforced dock for pin-on tools, and a large pocket with zip access front and rear for fly boxes or accessories. When you factor in the additional large stretch-fabric compartment and utility tabs on
    the wader front, you can pretty much carry a day’s worth of tackle and dispense with a vest or chest pack altogether. The reach-through hand-warmer pockets are welcome, the microfleece lining is comfy in the chill, and storm-flapped openings prevent rain entry and (hallelujah!) won’t catch on oar handles. 

    MSRP: $500; simmsfishing.com

    Patagonia Capilene 4 Expedition Weight Zip-Neck and Bottoms

    This next-generation Cap uses a new Polartec Power Dry High Efficiency fabric developed specifically for Patagonia. The base layer is thinner and less bulky than previous versions, but warmer and more breathable—ideal for cold-weather angling that involves periods of exertion (like hiking) alternating with intervals of low activity (like not catching fish). It also checks those annoying aromas of personal funk.

    MSRP: $99 and $79; patagonia.com

    Cabela’s Gore-Tex Guidewear Bass Angler Jacket and Bibs

    Almost inevitably, rain gear involves a tradeoff. Hard-wearing, heavyweight stuff restricts motion and in hot weather will braise you in your own juices; cooler, more supple ultralight suits don’t give long service. The Guidewear jacket and bibs, however, sensibly balance ruggedness with easy mobility to provide superior wind and water protection in a shell.
     
    The 75-denier Gore-Tex three-layer laminate is remarkably tough, and the design promotes durability by keeping seams (and seam tape) out of high-wear areas such as knees and elbows. At the same time, the fabric offers high breathability for hot-weather wear and a comfortable flexibility for easy movement around a boat. It’s an ideal three-season weight with features that focus squarely on utility. Waterproof YKK zippers, a three-point adjusting hood, hook-and-loop cuffs, and storm-flapped thigh-high leg zippers seal out the elements. Five pockets on the jacket and five more on the bibs keep a generous selection of tackle and tools right at hand. An internal waist adjustment on the bibs helps corral excess fabric for a good fit, and a grippy facing holds suspenders in place. Reflective fabric strips, top and bottom, increase visibility for safety. In terms of function, nothing’s missing and nothing’s wasted.

    MSRP: $300; cabelas.com

    Simms Headwaters Large Sling Pack

    Bandolier-style sling packs are an immensely practical—and increasingly popular—alternative to vests, chest packs, and lumbar packs. They’re less restrictive, more comfortable, and more versatile. And this is a particularly functional incarnation of the concept; it doesn’t just store your tackle but keeps it organized as well. Sleeves in the main compartment hold boxes of flies or lures and accessories and prevent them from jumbling together at the bottom. A big exterior pocket puts three or four additional boxes (or other gear) at your fingertips. A second, compression-molded exterior pocket (with still more tackle sleeves) unzips to form a drop-down tray that serves as a rigging station—a handy feature for wade fishermen. The wide, padded sling strap slides smoothly over your shoulder for easy access, and a waist strap stabilizes the load when hiking or wading. Smart.

    MSRP: $120; simmsfishing.com

    MARINE ELECTRONICS

    Staying ahead of the game in the world of electronics is no easy feat, whether you’re talking TVs or fishfinders. Garmin, however, rises to the challenge, producing one of the most impressive all-in-one units on the water today. It’s so far out in front that it makes you wonder what they could possibly come up with next year. By Joe Cermele

    Garmin GPSmap 741xs

    Garmin’s GPSmap 741xs operates via touch screen much like an iPad or iPhone, and it even has the same pinch-to-zoom technology. This may seem like overkill, but on a rocking boat, or when it’s cold, or when you’re running 70 mph across the lake, fumbling with buttons and toggles is no fun. The unit comes preloaded with Garmin’s full array of saltwater maps as well as 14,000 bodies of freshwater. Boasting a processor that’s 60 percent faster than any of Garmin’s previous offerings, it changes charts with incredible speed. There are too many features to mention them all (it does just about everything except make breakfast), but what stood out most during our test was the high-­definition sonar imaging and a depth-­shading function available with an additional LakeVü card. If you can’t catch fish with the 741xs, you should consider quitting fishing.

    MSRP: Starts at $1,700; garmin.com

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  • Oregon Fishing Report - July 1st 2014


    Oregon Fishing Report - July 1st, 2014

    Weekend fishing opportunities

    July is when cutthroat trout start to move into the estuaries and lower sections of many area rivers.

    With the onset of warmer temperatures, warmwater fishing should be picking up in several local area waters.

    Largemouth bass fishing has been good on Temmile and other lakes. Summer can be a great time to target largemouth with topwater lures.

    ROGUE RIVER

    Rogue River, lower: steelhead, Chinook, surfperch
      
    Fall chinook should start moving into the estuary anytime.

    Anglers are picking up a few early run summer steelhead casting spinners or fly fishing.

    Anglers are picking up surfperch on many beaches and at the mouth of the Rogue River. Anglers should check the marine forecast before heading out.

    Rogue River, middle: steelhead, trout, spring Chinook

    Anglers are catching a few summer steelhead in the middle Rogue. Chinook fishing remains slow in this section of the river. The flow at Grants Pass was 2,390 cfs and the water temperature was 63°F on June 30.

    Rogue River, upper: steelhead, trout, spring Chinook

    Anglers are catching spring Chinook and a few summer steelhead in the river from Gold Hill upstream to Cole Rivers Hatchery. Drift fishing, backtrolling bait-wrapped plugs, and backbouncing with bait or drift bobbers are popular and productive techniques. Fishing has been most productive early and late in the day.

    Beginning July 1, anglers will be able to keep non-adipose fin-clipped (wild) Chinook salmon in the Rogue River from Fishers Ferry Boat Ramp to Dodge Bridge per the Southwest Zone fishing regulations. Above Dodge Bridge, non-adipose fin-clipped salmon will still have to be released.

    Trout fishing has been good. Anglers may keep up to five adipose fin-clipped rainbow trout per day. All other trout must be released.

    The release from Lost Creek Reservoir was 2,205 cfs and the water temperature was 52°F the morning of June 30. The flow at Gold Ray was 2,350 cfs with a water temperature of 57°F. As of June 25, 5,732 spring Chinook and 134 summer steelhead had entered Cole Rivers Hatchery. So far this season, the hatchery has recycled 3,561 spring Chinook salmon back downstream to Gold Hill to give anglers another chance at catching these fish.

    Rogue River, above Lost Creek Reservoir: trout

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